Sound United, LLC d/b/a Definitive Technology v. Amazon.com seller audio video sales guy (19-cv-12541).

In December, home theater maker Sound United sued Amazon sellers Amazing Deals Online, and a third, unknown seller identified as “Amazon.com seller audio video sales guy” (“AVSG”), accusing each of infringing Sound United trademarks for such products, including DENON, POLK AUDIO, MARANTZ, DEFINITIVE TECHNOLOGY, HEOS, BOSTON ACOUSTICS, and CLASSE while not being authorized resellers of such products. The resellers are further accused of suggesting that a manufacturer’s warranty. Sound United does not assert that the marks are being placed on non-Sound United products; instead, Sound United asserts that the defendants obtained Sound United product from authorized resellers in knowing violation of the resellers’ agreements with Sound United. Sound United asserted trademark infringement, tortious interference with contractual relations, and violation of Ch. 93A.

Sound United, having been unable to find a physical mailing address or business location for the unknown seller AVSG, sought permission to serve that entity using its Amazon.com electronic mail service. Magistrate Judge Cabell granted the motion, noting that under Massachusetts law, when a process servers reports back that after a diligent search he or she cannot find the defendant, the defendant’s last and usual address, or an agent upon whom process may be served, the court may issue an order of notice. He determined that, under the circumstances, service via Amazon was reasonably calculated to prove requisite notice.

Welch Foods, Inc. v. Healthy Food Brands LLC (119-cv-12556).

Welch Foods, a cooperative corporation owned by more than 750 farmer families, filed suit against its former licensee Healthy Food Brands (“HFB”), accusing it of violating its contract with Welch and of trademark infringement in connection with HFB’s continued marketing and sale of licensed products post-termination. Welch owns a number of federal trademark registrations to marks that include the term “WELCH’S” for a variety of food products and services. In 2014, Welch and HFB entered into a license agreement under which HFB would develop, manufacture and sell products such as dried and freeze-dried fruits and trail mixes under the WELCH’S BRAND. The license granted exclusivity in this area. The agreement provided for the payment of royalties based on sales, with certain minimum royalties established, and also sets forth reporting requirements on HFB sales. Welch asserts that HFB has missed a number of royalty payments and has never provided the required sales information, with the purpose of hiding the actual level of sales. After providing written notice of these breaches and allowing the passage of the required time to cure, Welch terminated the agreement in June, 2019. While the agreement requires the return or destruction of all WELCH’S-branded products upon termination, Welch asserts that HFB has instead continued to sell these products. Welch asserts breach of contract, breach of the covenant of good faith and fair dealing that is inherently applied to Massachusetts contracts, quantum meruit, unjust enrichment, trademark infringement, false association, unfair competition and dilution under the Lanham Act, and violation of Mass. G.L. c. 93A. Judge Stearns has been assigned the case.

Sensitech, Inc. v. Grupo OFAS, SA de CV et al. (19-cv-12554).

Sensitech, a maker of monitoring devices for monitoring and maintaining manufacturing and storage conditions, sued its former Mexican distributor Grupo, accusing Grupo OFAS of trademark infringement and breach of contract. The agreement by which OFAS would distribute certain Sensitech products in Mexico terminated on November 30, 2015; at that point, OFAS was obliged to return all Sensitech IP and make all payments due. Sensitech asserts that OFAS never made the required payments and continues to use Sensitech trademarks and hold itself out as a licensed Sensitech distributor, and was using shell companies to try to obtain additional Sensitech products. Sensitech alleges a 93A violation in addition to the Lanham Act and contract causes of action. The case is before Judge Burroughs.

SimpliSafe, Inc. v. Switchmate Home LLC (19-cv-12520).

SimpliSafe, a company that sells home security products and services under registered SIMPLISAFE marks, sued Switchmate Home for trademark infringement, false designation of origin, unfair competition, and unfair business practices under both the Lanham Act and Ch. 93A. SimpliSafe asserts that Switchmate’s use of SIMPLYSMART, SIMPLYSMART HOME, SIMPLYSMART CUBE, and SIMPLYSMART HOME CUBE in connection with “smart” home technology such as light switches, power outlets, picture frames and doorbell video cameras infringes the SIMPLISAFE marks. SimpliSafe further asserts that the color scheme and font selected by Switchmate mirrors the font and gray and blue stylized SIMPLISAFE registration. According to the complaint, upon receiving notice from SimpliSafe of these issues, Switchmate not only refused to cease use of the marks, it introduced a line of home security products under the SIMPLYSMART mark. Switchmate also registered several of the SIMPLYSMART marks with the PTO. SimpliSafe points to both actual customer confusion and survey evidence of confusion. In addition to the affirmative claims, SimpliSafe seeks cancellation of Switchmate’s SIMPLYSMART HOME, SIMPLYSMART CUBE, and SIMPLYSMART HOME CUBE registrations.

Moreland a/k/a Ana Cheri et al. v. Malebox, LLC d/b/a Shadow Bar & Lounge et al. (19-cv-30093).

Judge Mastroianni granted Shadow Box owner Brian Goldricks’ motion to dismiss the claims asserted against him in his individual capacity. To survive the motion to dismiss, Moreland was required to make factual allegations that Goldrick was the motive, active conscious force behind the alleged trademark infringement, and (with respect to the state law claims) that he was personally involved in the alleged tortious acts. Judge Mastroianni found that the complaint made only conclusory statements (such as “on information and belief” allegations), which are not, as phrased, factual allegations and are therefore not credited when determining whether the complaint meets the Iqbal/Twombly pleading standards.

Bodega, LLC v. Bodega Rose, Inc. at al. (19-cv-12474).

Bodega, LLC of Boston is an on-line and brick-and-mortar store that sells limited edition footwear and clothing, including footwear co-branded with the “Bodega” label. Bodega asserts that Bodega Rose infringes its registered “BODEGA” and “BDGA” trademarks through sales of “Bodega Rose”- labelled clothing and sneaker-shaped planters. Bodega noted that, in addition to the complaint, it was opposing the “BODEGA ROSE” trademark application that the defendant had filed. In the complaint, Bodega asserts both federal and common law trademark infringement, unfair competition and unjust enrichment.

Mitchell Repair Information Company, LLC v. Kevin Truong d/b/a Kevin Nguyen (19-cv-12388).

Mitchell Repair is the owner of the copyright in an automotive diagnostic software program series known as “Mitchell On-Demand.” The software is available for license from Mitchell Repair, either as a perpetual license or as a twelve-month, renewable license. In either case, the license is non-transferable. Mitchell asserts copyright infringement against Kevin Truong, asserting that Truong obtained an unauthorized version of the software and sold copies to service stations in towns north of Boston. Mitchell also asserts violation of c. 93A.