Merchant Consulting Group, Inc. v. Beckpat, LLC (17-11405).

Merchant Consulting served a third-party subpoena on Blue Square Resolutions, a Scottsdale Arizona entity, seeking documents in its trademark infringement case against Beckpat. When Blue Square failed to respond or otherwise make contact with Merchant, Merchant filed a motion for contempt pursuant to Fed. R. Civ. P. 45(g). In granting the motion, Magistrate Judge Kelley found that the subpoena was properly served by mailing it to Blue Square, noting that in Massachusetts, service is proper where effectuated by a means reasonably calculated to complete delivery and the respondents had actual notice of the subpoena. She found that Massachusetts was the proper forum to enforce the subpoena, because the subpoena called for documents to be produced in Massachusetts, making this state the district where compliance was required, particularly given that Blue Square never raised an objection to production in Massachusetts. Having found Blue Square in contempt, Judge Kelley ordered Blue Square to comply with the subpoena within ten days, with a recommendation to the District Court that failure to do so should result in an order to show cause why monetary sanctions should not be imposed. She further recommended that Blue Square be ordered to pay Merchant’s legal fees associated with bring the motion for contempt.

SiOnyx, LLC et al. v. Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. et al. (15-cv-13488).

Magistrate Judge Boal denied SiOnyx’ motion for evidentiary sanctions against Hamamatsu Photonics and Hamamatsu Corp.SiOnyx and Harvard filed suit in 2015, asserting correction of inventorship, patent infringement, and breach of contract. In discovery, Hamamatsu produced summary spreadsheets of damages information without providing the underlying invoices and purchase orders. By order of October 2017, the court ordered Hamamatsu to provide that information and some additional sales data. SiOnyx asserts that Hamamatsu failed to produce the information prior to the taking of depositions of Hamamatsu personnel and provided inaccurate and shifting information relating to damages, and sought both to preclude Hamamatsu from relying on the summary data and to have sales figures taken from annual reports be deemed established pursuant to Rule 37. Citing the strong presumption of allowing cases to be decided on the merits, Judge Boal determined that the defendants’ conduct was no so extreme as to warrant evidentiary sanctions (which were the only sanctions sought by SiOnyx). Judge Boal next addressed a dispute as to the interpretation of the October order, which modified certain requests for sales data to exclude data on unaccused products. Hamamatsu chose to interpret this to require production only of documents expressly mentioning an accused product. Judge Boal corrected them and ordered production of all sales documents that pertained to an accused product, but did not find them to be in contempt of the October order.